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Russ Miller Signature "Work Horse"
DCP Tone Shapes 

When I was asked by Zildjian, to create this signature palette of Tone Shapes for the Gen-16 DCP system, I immediately thought of calling it the "Work Horse" patches. I wanted to make solid, versatile Tone Shapes, that could work in a variety of musical situations and get you started utilizing the Gen-16 AE system, in your everyday playing situations. There are 6 full kits of sounds, all put together around a theme. Named: Dry Rock, Dry Pop, Dark, Verb, Industrial and EFX. These all have the full 5-channels each of Tone Shapes to compliment a full AE set-up. Of course, these can be interchanged (they are leveled to do so) and you could just use a couple of units and not the entire set-up. I programmed these while playing the full kit in the studio. Everything was referenced through the studio console and used in music tracking to confirm levels and projection qualities. I believe it represents some of the best Tones possible from the system and I hope they are effective and inspiring to you, as they were to me!"

1. Dry Pop Kit -
(Click here for Crash audio sample)
2. Dark Kit -
(Click here for Crash audio sample)
3. Verb Kit -
(Click here for Crash audio sample)
4. Industrial Kit -
(Click here for Crash audio sample)
5. EFX Kit -
(Click here for Crash audio sample)

Pre-loaded Russ Miller Signature Tone Shape Cymbal file here


For best results Russ recommends the DS sensor be placed at the base of the bell

Remember; the O-Ring goes between the sensor & the cymbal (underside of cymbal)


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Simon Edgoose Signature DCP Tone Shapes 

These cymbal sets are designed to give a selection of simple sounds that can be used for every day playing. Some tome shapes are more general use such as the Bright, Classic and Dark, while others such as the LS and the LPHP (meaning low pass, high pass) are designed for more electronic uses. Each cymbal set consists of a 12 inch splash, which can also be used with the China, 16 inch crash, 18 inch crash, 20 inch ride and 14 inch hats, but of course they can be used with any of the cymbals to achieve the sound you are looking for. When it comes to positioning the pick up I generally use the sixth line of holes below the bell for the ride, and a similar position for the crashes and the splash. The hi hat is different in that I set the pick up about one third of the distance along the bow from the bell to the edge, closer to the bell. In the audio examples I also have three rivets mounted on the right cymbal. For these examples I have used copper rivets for a gentle, subtle sound, but if you want a slightly more aggressive riveted sound then I would suggest to use the standard Zildjian steel rivet. I use four rivets equally spaced around the outer edge of the ride cymbal, or on these audio examples I use three rivets in three consecutive holes at the very edge. I have found that placing the pickup can dramatically change the sound of the cymbals. In my experience, most of the high frequencies of a cymbal come from the bell, therefore if the pickup is mounted close to the bell it will give a brighter sound. If I want to darker, dry sound, I generally moved to pick up more towards the edge, never more than half way from the bell to the very edge of the cymbal. You also have to remember that moving the pickup closer to the edge will also dampen the cymbal. Please experiment with the position of the pickup as you may find the perfect sound for you just by moving the pickup a few holes away from where you usually use it. You can get such a wide variety of sounds and feels from moving the pick up that it is worth spending some time finding what suits you best. I have also mixed the video audio examples to be more what I would expect from a drum kit being played with acoustic cymbals. It is my experience that most electronic drummers and acoustic drummers tend to mix their cymbals much too high in the mix, as that it the sound they are used to sitting behind the kit. Therefore I would suggest you listen closely to the overall mix of your drums and cymbals and make sure the cymbals are balenced with the drums. You need to sound like a record not like you're sitting behind the drum kit at the time. One other thing I have discovered over time working with Gen 16 is that the cymbals sound very different when you're physically playing on them. The air movement off the cymbals and the vibration through the drumsticks dramatically out to the experience of playing Gen 16. In the video examples I am playing a Yamaha DTX 502 kit triggering Addictive Drums on a MacBook Pro. The audio of the cymbals is recorded directly out of the DCP directly into the MacBook via a Focusrite audio interface. I have used electronic drums for many years now, but in my experience no pads feel like Gen 16 cymbals, because they are real cymbals, not plastic and rubber. There is no problem with different zones and triggering MIDI notes, because these are to all intents and purposes, real cymbals playing real cymbals sounds. They feel very natural and very comfortable to play. They feel great.

 

1. Bright -
(Click here for audio sample)
2. Dark -
(Click here for audio sample)
3. Classic -
(Click here for audio sample)
4. Low Short-
(Click here for audio sample)
5. FatBrite -
(Click here for audio sample)
6. Low Pass/High Pass-
(Click here for audio sample)
7. LoDark -
(Click here for audio sample)

Pre-loaded Simon Edgoose Signature Tone Shape Cymbal file here

Gen 16 Signature Sounds Audio Descriptions

I have designed these sets to sound great as a whole, rather than individual cymbals put into a set. Obviously, you can mix-and-match to make the set which suits you best, but to make things easy, all the sounds in set 1 for instance, will blend well, and the sounds in set two will blend with set two etc. However, don't go by what I say, try them in various musical situations and hopefully you'll see what I was aiming at when I started programming these.

Set 1 - Bright > This is the most general-purpose set. I wanted to make something which was full sounding for the crashes slightly thinner for the high hats so they cut nicely, and realistic enough so that they sound good in a musical situation. The ride is nicely sticky. But you can easily crash it and the bell is very easy to play. The splash setting gives a full sound almost like a small crash, but it also works great with the china cymbal.

Set 2 - Dark > These hi hats are some of the lowest and chunkiest sounding hats in these sets. The crashes are still full and fat, the ride has a little less stick to it than set 1, and the splash is nicely trashy and almost played-out sounding, like a 50 year old 12” splash would.

Set 3 - Classic > This is a more vintage sounding set. I have rolled off a little of the high end to make them slightly muted and dull like you get with some very old cymbals. Because of this, they blend very nicely in musical tracks. The high hats are still slightly bright, more bright than the rest of the cymbals, so they still cut nicely through the mix.

Set 4 – LS (Low Short) > This is a slightly more mid range sounding set. There's a little less high and low which means they're slightly less cutting and slightly less warm but the fill the sound the audio spectrum nicely. The hi hats sound very mid range when played by themselves, in a way that doesn't sound great in isolation, but that fits nicely into tracks. The splash sounds a little played out again but in a musical context it sounds very trashy and fast. The ride has a little more stick attack and crashes easily.

Set 5 - FatBrite > The 18 inch crash is a big slab of sound. The 16 inch crash by comparison is much faster and thinner sounding. The ride is more sticky and crushable with less low end. The splash is nicely fast and trashy.

Set 6 – LPHP (Low Pass High Pass) > This is the thinnest sounding set overall. This is a great set for practising with when you need to be able to hear the definition of the cymbals as clearly as possible. Everything is designed to cut to the maximum amount with a minimum amount of spread behind that. Hi hats are very, very sticky, the crashes are thin, the ride is toppy, and the splash is very trashy and fast.

Set 7 - LoDark > This set is a combination set. For instance the 18 inch crash is very fat sounding, the 16 crash is much thinner and faster, so they work as an interesting pair. This has probably the most conventional splash sound of all the sets – fast and with a 'tish' to the sound. The ride and the high hats work very well as a pair being very sticky and fast, but still crashable.

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When your DCP is connected to your computer via USB, with the DCP Access Tool you can check your Cymbal Processor's software and hardware version numbers, check the Gen16 servers for available upgrades, upgrade your Cymbal Processor's firmware, and upload new cymbal and reverb DSP presets to it.

The Access Tool application can also display a variety of information about your Cymbal Processor such as its firmware and hardware versions, which may be important if you ever need to contact Gen16 Tech Support.

The Access Tool will automatically check for DCP firmware updates on launch if a DCP is connected and an internet connection is available. You can also check manually at any time by selecting "Check for Updates" in the Access Tool's "Help" menu. If updates are available, the Access Tool will guide you through the download and installation process.

System Requirements:
- Macintosh OS X v10.4 (Tiger) or higher, Intel processor only
- Microsoft Windows XP/Vista/7/8

Current Access Tool Version Available for Download: Version 3.2.0, Released June 29, 2013.
Access Tool Release Notes for Version 3.2.0:
Mac Version
PC Version
Complete Version History

- Mac Version 3.2.0 Download - PC Version 3.2.0 Download - Documentation

 

The Access Tool will automatically check for DCP firmware updates on launch if a DCP is connected and an internet connection is available. You can also check manually at any time by selecting "Check for Updates" in the Access Tool's "Help" menu. If updates are available, the Access Tool will guide you through the download and installation process.

The Gen-16 Access Tool 3.2.0 and new DCP firmware 3.1.1 add many new features and enhancements to the AE Cymbal System, including:

- 10 improved cymbal presets for the original AE pickups, including splashes and Chinas.
- 10 new cymbal presets for the new Direct Source pickups, including splashes and Chinas.
- More DSP tone-shaping power.
- Display of DCP preset names in the Cymbal Editor.
- Remote control of preset selection and channel soloing from the Cymbal Editor.
- Expanded preset auditioning and editing features in the Set Editor.
- "Sticky Focus" in DSP controls makes it easier to make adjustments with one hand while hitting cymbals with the other.
- Routing switch for the DCP's Aux input so you can send click tracks etc. to the headphone output only.
- Numerous performance improvements and bug fixes.

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DCP Firmware Updater Release Notes: View
Current Versions:
DCP: 3.1.1 Click here for the updated Firmware
DSP: 1.5.8
Bootloader: 2.6.1



User

AE System w/DS Pickups
Info for systems with Direct Source Pickups
___________________________________

- NEW Direct Source Pickup Advanced Guide

- Direct Source Pickup Quick Start Guide

NEW Gen16 Direct Source Part List

- Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - English


 - Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - French


- Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - German


 - Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - Italian


- Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - Chinese


- Buffed Bronze Box Set &
Quick Start Guide - Japanese


AE System w/Mic Pickups
Info for systems with Dual Condenser Pickups
___________________________________


- AE Cymbal System
Setup Guide

- AE Cymbals Advanced
User Guide

- AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide

- AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide
Brazilian Portuguese

 - AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide
Chinese - Simple

- AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide -
Chinese - Traditional

 - AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
European Portuguese


 - AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
Italian

 - AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
Japanese
- AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide -
Korean


 - AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
Latin Spanish

 - AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide -
Russian


- AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
Spanish


 - AE Cymbal System
Quick Start Guide -
French

 - AE Cymbal System Quick Start Guide -
German

Reduced Volume Cymbals
Info for reduced volume acoustic cymbals.
___________________________________

- NEW Buffed Bronze Single Cymbal
Quick Start Guide

 


AE Rack Systems

Info for all Gen16 AE Racks and Components
___________________________________


- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
English


- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Chinese - Traditional

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Chinese - Simple

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Brazilian Portuguese

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
European Portuguese

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
European Spanish

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
French

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
German

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Italian

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Japanese

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Korean

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Latin American Spanish

- AE Rack System
Quick Start Guide -
Japanese
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